DiMariano Family Dentistry Blog

Posts for: January, 2014

By Drs. Jeff DiMariano & Shaina DiMariano
January 28, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: celebrity smiles  
HowiTheBiggestLoseriStarJillianMichaelsKeepsHerWinningSmile

Anyone who has seen fitness and life coach Jillian Michaels on The Biggest Loser and Losing It with Jillian knows she has the expertise and determination to help overweight people reach new levels of fitness and health. Using her own difficult life experiences, Jillian is able to help others look below the surface to the roots of their own unhealthy lifestyles. As a child, she suffered from night terrors, then her parents divorced when she was 12. She reacted to her anger and unhappiness by comforting herself with food. By age 17 she weighed 175 pounds — too much weight for her small 5'2" frame. To get Jillian involved in physical activity, her mother signed her up for a martial arts class. It was the right choice. Jillian loved the physical and spiritual aspects of martial arts practice, and this training pointed the way to what ultimately became her career.

It's no wonder Jillian is concerned about America's obesity problem — especially in children. To counter it, she and a business partner put together a Wii game, “Jillian Michaels' Fitness Ultimatum.” “If you turn exercise into a game, it's much easier to get kids to join in,” she says.

For adults, Jillian is concerned with unhealthy body images put forward by the fashion industry and media. She says, “Educating women on the importance of a healthy diet and exercise program is essential, but getting them to realize that women are supposed to have curves is equally important.” She is working on a new book, which is designed to help people live a healthy lifestyle, realize their true potential, and find happiness in just being themselves.

Since good health also includes good oral health, here's a sampling of what Jillian discussed about healthy habits in her interview with Dear Doctor magazine.

How can parents encourage their children to have healthy habits? Jillian says it starts with parents setting a good example. Parents can persuade children to get exercise by going outside to play with them. Gardening together and serving kids home-grown vegetables is a good way to encourage healthy eating.

What is her dental care routine? Jillian brushes her teeth two or three times a day with an electric toothbrush and she flosses daily. She never leaves home without toothpaste, an electric travel toothbrush, and floss as well as some sort of lip gloss. She sees her dentist, whom she calls “amazing,” at least twice a year for cleanings.

How does she guard against damage from martial arts? Jillian broke her two front teeth as a child and had them repaired with crowns. Now she wears a mouthguard when doing vigorous exercise.

What other cosmetic dental procedures has she had? She also had braces and has had her teeth whitened.

Jillian knows that it takes hard work and commitment to health and exercise, along with good oral health habits, to look and feel your best. You can learn more about Jillian by reading the entire interview in the article “Jillian Michaels: The Biggest Loser's health and wellness expert talks about her oral health, keeping fit and plans for the future.” Contact us today to discuss your questions about tooth whitening, crowns, or mouthguards or to schedule an appointment.


By Drs. Jeff DiMariano & Shaina DiMariano
January 24, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene  
TechniqueJustasImportantWithPoweredToothbrushesasWithManual

Electric-powered toothbrushes have been in use for decades, and continue to enjoy wide popularity. But since their inception in the 1950s, there’s been a continuous debate not only about the best choice among powered toothbrushes, but whether powered toothbrushes are as effective in removing plaque as manual toothbrushes.

These debates are fueled by a large body of research over many years on powered toothbrushes. For instance, an independent research firm known as the Cochrane Collaboration has evaluated over 300 hundred studies of powered toothbrushes (over a thirty-year span) using international standards to analyze the data.

Surprisingly, they found only one type of powered toothbrush (using a rotation-oscillation action) that statistically outperformed manual toothbrushes in the reduction of plaque and gingivitis. Although from a statistical point of view the difference was significant, in practical terms it was only a modest increase in efficiency.

In all actuality, the most important aspect about toothbrushes in effective oral hygiene isn’t the brush, but how it’s used — or as we might say, “it’s not the brush so much as the hand that holds it.” The fact remains, after first flossing, a manual toothbrush can be quite effective in removing plaque if you brush once or twice a day with a soft-bristle brush using a gentle brushing motion.

Although a powered toothbrush does much of the work for you, it still requires training to be effective, just as with a manual toothbrush. We would encourage you, then, to bring your toothbrush, powered or manual, on your next cleaning visit: we would be happy to demonstrate proper technique and give you some useful tips on making your brushing experience more effective.

Remember too: brushing your teeth and flossing isn’t the whole of your oral hygiene. Although a critical part, brushing and flossing should also be accompanied with semi-annual professional cleanings to ensure the removal of as much disease-causing plaque as possible.

If you would like more information on types of toothbrushes, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Manual vs. Powered Toothbrushes.”


By Drs. Jeff DiMariano & Shaina DiMariano
January 16, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: dental implants   tooth loss  
ItCouldbeMoreThanaToothYoureLosing

There’s more to tooth loss than you might think. Because teeth are part of a larger system that facilitates speaking, eating and digestion, a lost tooth could eventually affect your overall health.

Tooth loss is actually about bone loss. As living tissue, bone continually reforms in response to stimuli it receives from the body. The alveolar bone (which surrounds and supports the teeth) receives such stimuli as the teeth chew and bite, as well as when they contact each other. All these stresses — hundreds a day — transmit through the periodontal ligament to the bone, stimulating it to grow and remodel.

A lost tooth reduces this stimulation and causes the alveolar bone to resorb (dissolve) — as much as 25% of its width the first year alone. Unless the process is stopped, the underlying basal bone and the periodontal (gum) tissue will begin to resorb too. Without this structural support the facial height shrinks and the front teeth begin to push forward, making chewing and speaking more difficult. These teeth begin performing functions outside their normal range, leading to damage and possible loss.

The primary goal of oral hygiene and dental care is to prevent tooth loss. When tooth loss does occur, however, it’s then important to restore the lost tooth with an artificial replacement if at all possible — not only to regain form and function, but to also stop further bone loss.

While the fixed partial denture (FPD), also known as a fixed bridge, has been the restoration of choice for many decades, dental implants may be the better long-term option. Although more expensive initially, implants can achieve a life-like restoration without involving or altering adjacent teeth as with FPDs. Plaque retention and tartar accumulations are much less likely with an implant, and the bone-loving quality of titanium, the metal used for implants, actually encourages bone growth. As a result, implants have a much higher longevity rate than FPDs.

Taking care of your teeth through effective hygiene practices and regular checkups may help you avoid tooth loss altogether. But if it can’t be avoided, restoring lost teeth is the single most important thing you can do to prevent even greater problems down the road.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Hidden Consequences of Losing Teeth.”


By Drs. Jeff DiMariano & Shaina DiMariano
January 08, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
MaintainingyourDentalImplants

Once you receive your dental implants, you can have peace-of-mind in knowing that you have chosen a successful tooth replacement option, with long-term success rates of well over 95%. Your implant will look, feel and function just like the natural teeth that it has replaced.

However, despite the natural appearance, when you visit us for a regular cleaning, you may notice that we are using special instruments to clean around the implant. Cleaning around implants differs from the maintenance of your natural teeth for two reasons:

  1. Your implants attach to the surrounding bone and gums in a very different way from your natural teeth.
  2. The materials that comprise your implants are very different than those that make up your natural teeth.

Cleaning implants is just as important as cleaning natural teeth, because both depend on healthy surrounding tissues for support. Just as bacterial biofilm (plaque) collects on your natural teeth, it can also collect on your implant. That is why it is very important to brush and floss thoroughly on a daily basis at home. Without daily biofilm removal, the gums surrounding your implant can become infected, leading to bone loss and eventually loss of the implant.

Your regular dental cleanings will also play an important role in keeping dental implants infection-free, and we will select the right instruments for a professional cleaning. We will ensure that these instruments will not damage the crown, abutment, or the implant itself. If implants are scratched, they can attract and harbor bacteria. That's why the instruments we use, called scalers and curettes, are most often made of plastics and resins. Natural teeth don't scratch in the same way, and therefore metal instruments need to be used to clean them.

A number of power instruments have nylon or plastic sheaths or tips to minimize implant damage. They clean by using high-frequency vibration, which may be necessary if large quantities of debris have accumulated on your implant. We use these on a low power setting with a lot of water irrigation, and sometimes antibacterial solutions, to clean and flush material.

When it comes to keeping your implants infection-free, keep in mind that the most successful formula will be consistent oral hygiene at home mixed with regular dental cleanings.

If you would like more information about maintaining your dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Maintenance.”