DiMariano Family Dentistry Blog

Posts for category: Dental Procedures

By DRS. JEFF DIMARIANO & SHAINA DIMARIANO
October 17, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Veneer  

Veneers from your family dentist in Sacramento, CA, can give you an outstanding smile

Are there things about your smile that you wish you could change? Have you stopped smiling because you are embarrassed by the veneerscondition of your teeth? If your smile isn’t all it could be, there is an easy solution. You need porcelain veneers! Dr. Jeff L. DiMariano in Sacramento, CA, offers a wide range of preventive, restorative, and cosmetic dental services including porcelain veneers, to give you an outstanding smile!

Porcelain veneers are thin laminates of light-reflecting porcelain which are cemented on to the front surfaces of your teeth. The light-reflective quality of porcelain combined with its close resemblance to tooth enamel makes porcelain the ideal material for veneers. Once your porcelain veneers are placed, they blend perfectly with your smile.

  • The natural beauty of porcelain veneers is only one benefit. There are many more. Consider that porcelain veneers are:
  • Long lasting, because porcelain is stain resistant, so your new veneers will stay beautiful for years
  • Conservative, because your family dentist removes little to no tooth structure, just enough to compensate for the thickness of the veneers
  • Versatile, because they can hide many unsightly issues with your teeth

In fact, you can change the size, color, shape, and other factors which bother you about your teeth. Veneers can help your smile by hiding:

  • Chips, erosion, or other age-related wear
  • Broken tooth structure, fracture lines, or other trauma-related problems
  • Blotches, discolorations or other defects in tooth color
  • Areas of slight tooth overlap, making your teeth appear straighter
  • Small gaps or spaces, by making your teeth appear closer together

Veneers require between 2 and 3 appointments, beginning with a consultation appointment, and ending with the final cementation of your custom-created veneers. Porcelain veneers are made just for you and for your individual smile to give you the smile you deserve.

To find out more about veneer treatment from your family dentist and how veneers can help you, call Dr. Jeff DiMariano in Sacramento, CA. Call and get started on your outstanding smile today!

By Drs. Jeff DiMariano & Shaina DiMariano
October 02, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
ADifferentKindofChipShotforProGolferDanielleKang

While the sport of golf may not look too dangerous from the sidelines, players know it can sometimes lead to mishaps. There are accidents involving golf carts and clubs, painful muscle and back injuries, and even the threat of lightning strikes on the greens. Yet it wasn’t any of these things that caused professional golfer Danielle Kang’s broken tooth on the opening day of the LPGA Singapore tournament.

“I was eating and it broke,” explained Kang. “My dentist told me, I've chipped another one before, and he said, you don't break it at that moment. It's been broken and it just chips off.” Fortunately, the winner of the 2017 Women’s PGA championship got immediate dental treatment, and went right back on the course to play a solid round, shooting 68.

Kang’s unlucky “chip shot” is far from a rare occurrence. In fact, chipped, fractured and broken teeth are among the most common dental injuries. The cause can be crunching too hard on a piece of ice or hard candy, a sudden accident or a blow to the face, or a tooth that’s weakened by decay or repetitive stress from a habit like nail biting. Feeling a broken tooth in your mouth can cause surprise and worry—but luckily, dentists have many ways of restoring the tooth’s appearance and function.

Exactly how a broken tooth is treated depends on how much of its structure is missing, and whether the soft tissue deep inside of it has been compromised. When a fracture exposes the tooth’s soft pulp it can easily become infected, which may lead to serious problems. In this situation, a root canal or extraction will likely be needed. This involves carefully removing the infected pulp tissue and disinfecting and sealing the “canals” (hollow spaces inside the tooth) to prevent further infection. The tooth can then be restored, often with a crown (cap) to replace the entire visible part. A timely root canal procedure can often save a tooth that would otherwise need to be extracted (removed).

For less serious chips, dental veneers may be an option. Made of durable and lifelike porcelain, veneers are translucent shells that go over the front surfaces of teeth. They can cover minor to moderate chips and cracks, and even correct size and spacing irregularities and discoloration. Veneers can be custom-made in a dental laboratory from a model of your teeth, and are cemented to teeth for a long-lasting and natural-looking restoration.

Minor chips can often be remedied via dental bonding. Here, layers of tooth-colored resin are applied to the surfaces being restored. The resin is shaped to fill in the missing structure and hardened by a special light. While not as long-lasting as other restoration methods, bonding is a relatively simple and inexpensive technique that can often be completed in just one office visit.

If you have questions about restoring chipped teeth, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Porcelain Veneers” and “Artistic Repair of Chipped Teeth With Composite Resin.”

By Drs. Jeff DiMariano & Shaina DiMariano
September 12, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implant  
IfAppropriateAntibioticsbeforeImplantSurgeryCouldReduceInfectionRisk

Millions of microorganisms call your mouth home—and while most are friendly, some are not. An invasive procedure like implant surgery can disrupt the mouth's soft tissues and allow disease-causing bacteria to enter the bloodstream.

This isn't necessarily a major concern if your immune system is sound—your body will move quickly to quash any developing infection. But if your body's defense is weak or compromised by other health conditions, an ensuing infection could cause you problems. In the case of a dental implant, a localized infection around it could lead to its failure.

The bone normally grows and adheres to the surface of an implant soon after it's placed, giving it the added strength and durability for which implants are best known. A bacterial infection, though, could impede bone integration and weaken the implant's hold within the jaw.

One way to avoid this is by treating patients at high risk for infection with an antibiotic before the procedure. In one recent study, researchers concluded that patients receiving a 2-gram dose of amoxicillin an hour before implant surgery helped reduce the risk of future implant failure.

But before taking this route, the dentist must first decide whether antibiotic pre-treatment might be more detrimental than beneficial to an individual patient. Antibiotics can cause side effects in certain people ranging from diarrhea to allergic reactions. Healthcare providers must also be prudent with administering antibiotics for the good of society in general—overuse can potentially give rise to antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

A number of healthcare associations highly recommend antibiotic pre-treatment for any dental patient with prosthetic heart valves, a history of infective endocarditis, a heart transplant and similar heart conditions. They also recognize patients with conditions like prosthetic joints, weakened immune systems, diabetics or other serious health problems could also benefit from antibiotic pre-treatment, but leave it to the physician's discretion on whether or not it's appropriate for an individual patient.

If you're planning to undergo implant surgery or a similar procedure and are concerned about infection, speak with your dentist about whether you would qualify and benefit from antibiotic pre-treatment. If appropriate, taking an antibiotic beforehand could minimize your infection risk.

If you would like more information on pre-surgical antibiotic treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Implants & Antibiotics: Lowering Risk of Implant Failure.”

By Drs. Jeff DiMariano & Shaina DiMariano
August 23, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
DontBreakItLikeBeckham

During his former career as a professional footballer (that's a soccer star to U.S. sports fans) David Beckham was known for his skill at “bending” a soccer ball. His ability to make the ball curve in mid-flight — to avoid a defender or score a goal — led scores of kids to try to “bend it like Beckham.” But just recently, while enjoying a vacation in Canada with his family, “Becks” tried snowboarding for the first time — and in the process, broke one of his front teeth.

Some fans worried that the missing tooth could be a “red card” for Beckham's current modeling career… but fortunately, he headed straight to the dental office as soon as he arrived back in England. Exactly what kind of treatment is needed for a broken tooth? It all depends where the break is and how badly the tooth is damaged.

For a minor crack or chip, cosmetic bonding may offer a quick and effective solution. In this procedure, a composite resin, in a color custom-made to match the tooth, is applied in liquid form and cured (hardened) with a special light. Several layers of bonding material can be applied to re-construct a larger area of missing tooth, and chips that have been saved can sometimes be reattached as well.

When more tooth structure is missing, dental veneers may be the preferred restorative option. Veneers are wafer-thin shells that are bonded to the front surface of the teeth. They can not only correct small chips or cracks, but can also improve the color, spacing, and shape of your teeth.

But if the damage exposes the soft inner pulp of the tooth, root canal treatment will be needed to save the tooth. In this procedure, the inflamed or infected pulp tissue is removed and the tooth sealed against re-infection; if a root canal is not done when needed, the tooth will have an increased risk for extraction in the future. Following a root canal, a tooth is often restored with a crown (cap), which can look good and function well for many years.

Sometimes, a tooth may be knocked completely out of its socket; or, a severely damaged tooth may need to be extracted (removed). In either situation, the best option for restoration is a dental implant. Here, a tiny screw-like device made of titanium metal is inserted into the jaw bone in a minor surgical procedure. Over time, it fuses with the living bone to form a solid anchorage. A lifelike crown is attached, which provides aesthetic appeal and full function for the replacement tooth.

So how's Beckham holding up? According to sources, “David is a trooper and didn't make a fuss. He took it all in his stride." Maybe next time he hits the slopes, he'll heed the advice of dental experts and wear a custom-made mouthguard…

If you have questions about restoring damaged teeth, please contact our office to schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Trauma and Nerve Damage to Teeth” and “Children's Dental Concerns and Injuries.”

By DRS. JEFF DIMARIANO & SHAINA DIMARIANO
July 25, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: fillings  

Fillings can help your smile by restoring decay and yes, beautifying how your teeth look. How can this be? Aren't fillings made of silvery-Smilelooking metal? Some are, but most are tooth-colored, explain your family dentists in Sacramento, CA, Dr. Jeff DiMariano and Dr. Shaina DiMariano. Blending with and strengthening natural tooth enamel, today's dental fillings are amazingly lifelike in every way.

 

What is a dental filling?

It's a restorative dental treatment which repairs a cavity--that is, a hole in tooth enamel caused by the corrosive effects of acid in the mouth. Oral bacteria contained in soft plaque and hard tartar, or calculus, secrete this harmful acid.

Additionally, some people are more prone to decay than others. Softer, thinner enamel, a carb-rich diet, acid reflux disease, oral trauma and deeply grooved tooth surfaces increase the chances of developing decay.

Most American adults have at least three fillings to restore decay, says the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. A filling replaces damaged tooth structure. In the past, metal amalgam was the only choice of material. Strong and durable, amalgam still can be the proper choice for some decay situations.

More likely though, your Sacramento, CA, dentist will choose composite resin, porcelain, or glass ionomer to fill your cavity. These high-tech materials are versatile, blend in with surrounding enamel and well-withstand the substantial pressure of biting and chewing. They also require far less enamel removal and preparation to install than old-fashioned materials do, leaving more tooth structure in place.

 

The filling treatment

Dr. DiMariano uses a high-speed drill and other tools to remove the decayed portions of your tooth. The dentist does this with benefit of local anesthetic so you're comfortable during the treatment.

After the site is prepared, the dentist chooses the proper material for your filling. Composite resin, a blend of glass and acrylic, is layered into a small to moderate-sized filling. A special light hardens each layer for maximum strength. Glass ionomer, a mix of fluoride and glass, works well on the buccal, lingual or interdental surfaces and helps prevent future decay. Porcelain inlays and onlays really are partial crowns. Customized to fit over the top of molars or in between the cusps or corners, inlays and onlays are permanently bonded in place.

 

Avoiding decay

The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends the following as great strategies for reducing dental decay or preventing is altogether:

  • Brush twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Floss daily.
  • Eat a diet low in carbohydrates.
  • Avoid between-meal snacks.
  • Stay hydrated with plenty of water, avoiding dry mouth, increasing saliva and rinsing tooth surfaces.
  • Get semi-annual examinations and cleanings.
  • Ask your dentist about in-office fluoride treatments and plastic sealants for more protection.

 

The best filling...

It's no filling at all. But, if decay happens, trust Dr. Jeff and Shaina DiMariano to uncover and treat it with the best materials available. If you have questions about our restorative procedures, including dental fillings, please call our Sacramento, CA, office at (916) 929-3898!